General Meeting, Oct. 3, 2021 Recap – Joan Lok, Demonstration artist

Forty-four members were in attendance for the October meeting. Pam started us off with a quick busines meeting and announcements.

Nov. 7 – The demo will be by Tim Wilmot:   https://www.timwilmot.com

Dec. 5Holiday Party at Kingswood Manor, off Lee Rd. There will be the raffle, mini paintings, members paintings, outdoor tent for finger foods, and a special appearance by Santa. Masks required for indoor activities. See our newsletter for details and sign up to help with and activity!

Feb. 6 – We hope to line up Niko Floyd, as a plein air event at Kingswood Manor. Check back for more info.

Our annual members art show will be chaired by Charlie Cipes. The juror and workshop artist will be Sue Archer. The workshop “Commanding Color” will be March 7, 8, 9, 2022 at a location to be determined.

Please check our website frequently and read the newsletter for continual updates on our upcoming season, and please consider volunteering to help us set up events.

Then Pam introduced our demonstration artist, Joan Lok, former president of the Sumi-e Society of America who paints in the Lingnan School style.

Joan talked about the basic 4 Treasures of Sumi-e: Paper, Brush, Ink Stick, and Ink Stone

Paper – we buy watercolor paper in weights of 140 or 300 lb. But rice paper, which is not made of rice but plant bark, is bought by the name of the paper. It comes raw (unsized) so when you touch the brush to the paper is absorbs quickly, or sized with alum, to slow down absorbency. Each family that makes the paper has their own secret recipe.

A variety of hard and soft round brushes
Hard and soft Hake, flat brushes.

Brushes – round brushes are used most of the time and they come in small, medium, large or extra-large sizes. They are constructed to use the entire hair and bristles are gathered to a point. (Our western watercolor brushes are cut to form the point.) Fan or flat brushes are used mostly for washes. Hard hair is bouncy and soft hair brushes, made from goat, is softer and doesn’t have as much bounce. Combo brushes have the harder hair in the middle surrounded by soft absorbent hair.

Ink Stick and stone – the ink is usually made with soot and glue, and then ground on the inkstone with a little water.

Eastern Art has 4 categories:

Mountain and stream landscape by Joan.

Landscapes – also called mountain & water, usually consists of scenery of mountains with water. Joan’s landscapes were painted with a limited palette using indigo for cool tones and burnt sienna for warm tones. Sunlight is not specific to a time of day. Seasons are more obvious.

Figures – which are ceremonial and usually not the center of attention, as is the custom in western art. Humans are shown in harmony with the universe.

Animals – often symbolic, such as fish being good luck. Cicadas, symbolize a hermit who doesn’t care for material things.

Grape vines with bird, by Joan.

Flowers & Birds – Mostly living flowers, in the garden, with birds in the composition.

She then showed a few samples, from the American Watercolor Society’s exhibition, highlighting the use of calligraphic strokes included in AWS paintings.

Diagram of how to triple load a brush.

She showed how to triple load a brush with light tone or water, medium tone yellow, then orange and dark red ink on the tip of the brush.

Flower petals and flower shown from the side.
Triple loaded brush does lovely petals.
Petal strokes for sunflower or cherry blossoms.

Push down, drag and then lift to make the petal. Three cherry blossoms painted holding the brush vertically, loading the brush with light, medium and dark paint. Practice as much as you can so you build “muscle training”.

Do a whole page of strokes, like the “bamboo stroke” which can be used for other things like electrical poles.

Power poles can be painted with the bamboo strokes.
Practice, practice strokes to build muscle memory.

Try the stokes right to left, then left to right. Do a cart wheel, and other strokes to fill a page. Taking Chinese brush painting classes, or sumi-e, can help you brush stokes become looser.

Do a whole page of practice strokes to build muscle memory.

The demonstration painting was a Peony flower.  Double load the brush with water and dark paint and work into the brush.

Double load with water and paint for petals.

Pres and lift the brush to do a thick and thin petal, remember to paint toward the center of the flower.

starting the peony by painting the top petals.
Add 2 side stroke petals.

Then add water and paint 2 side strokes. Build petals outward.

Paint top center petals and build the blossom from the center outward.

After you do the blossom, refine and add a few more layers of petals.

Finished peony blossom.

Then add the leaves. Black or green can be used for sumi leaves. Paint 3 or 4 lobes for the leaves. When the leaf is semi dry add the veins in black. Practice the calligraphic strokes of the veins to elevate your painting.

Leaves have 3 or 4 lobes.
Blossom with green leaves and black veins.

We use green in a big brush. Load with yellow, green and black on the tip. The finished Peony is beautiful. Thank you, Joan!

For online classes with Joan Lok, check her site:   https://joanlokart.thinkific.com

 

 

 

 

Oct. 3, 2021 – Demo by Joan Lok / CFWS General Meeting

      Joan Lok creates artworks that link Asian tradition to an adventurous, modern viewpoint. Born in Hong Kong, Joan came to America in 1983 after winning an international cultural exchange fellowship. Joan won many awards including the Best of Show from the Sumi-e Society of America and Sumi-e Artists of Canada Joint Exhibition, the Kyoto Education Council Award in Japan, and the National Cherry Blossom Festival Contest in America. Joan is listed in Who’s Who of American Art. Her art instruction book “Chinese Brush Painting: Flowers” is available in English, Dutch, French, Italian, and Spanish. Joan lives in Columbia, Maryland and teaches sumi-e workshops locally and across the country. In 2020, she converted her popular workshops into online learning, spreading the joy of sumi-e with artists joining safely from home.

https://www.joanlok.com

Online art courses can be found at:

https://joanlokart.thinkific.com

Demonstration for the Central Florida Watercolor Society, October 3, 2021:

      Joan Lok will introduce the art of sumi-e that literally means Water and Ink Painting.  She will discuss its origin and development, materials, and the art form’s emphasis on brushwork, simplicity and spiritual connection (chi or energy.)  Joan will demonstrate creating floral and natural subjects in spontaneous brushstrokes.

Artists looking for ways to loosen their watercolor artwork will enjoy seeing how Joan spontaneously creates petals and leaves with single strokes, and develop branches and trees without a sketch.

Joan’s book “Chinese Brush Painting: Flowers is available at Amazon.com.

Congratulations to Joan on her recent award from the Sumi-e Society of America:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9ZbqilwLyY

 

 

November ’21 Demo Artist – Tim Wilmot

The fall issue of Watercolor Magazine features watercolorist Tim Wilmot. He will be our demo artist via Zoom in November 2021.  Tim is not only accomplished in watercolor but he has also made his honed skill generously accessible via YouTube and Patreon to other watercolorists around the world.

This demo will be interactive.  Attendees can ask questions during the demo and Tim will give his feedback.  The demos start with Tim planning his composition, executing the initial sketch and diving in with color and his loose style, ending with a finished work.

Ho Chi Minh Market, Watercolor, 15″ x 11″

You can see more of his work by visiting his website at timwilmotartist.com.

 

 

October ’21 Demo Artist – Joan Lok

On recommendation from Teri Chin, we have contracted Joan Lok  for October’s online demo. Joan’s presentation will cover a brief introduction to her art, followed by illustration of brushstrokes and an art demo.

Check back soon, samples are on the way or visit her website at www.joanlok.com.

Members Meeting Dec. 6 with Kim Johnson Nechtman

Make sure you attend our next CFWS members meeting on Sunday, Dec. 6 to see a fabulous demonstration by Kim Johnson Nechtman! I had the privilege of working with her today over the zoom software. She is an award winning artist and signature member of AWS, NWS, SDWS,AWA and many more. Her work is beautiful, as this painting from Splash 17 illustrates:

Workshops

She will be teaching a workshop in Winter Haven at Ridge Art Association from 9am – 4pm. The dates are Feb. 24-27.

There is a Holiday Inn and a Hampton Inn next to the complex where class is being held. Contact Cathi Draper at (863)521-0098 if you have questions or would like to sign up!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corona scare has disrupted our schedule

Our April and May Meetings are cancelled due to the Corona Virus directives.

SOBO Gallery, host to our Annual Show, has closed the gallery, hoping for a re-opening mid May and our show will hang through May 31st. Work will be picked up by artists on a yet to be determined date after May 31st. Bear with us, the exact date has not been determined. If you need access to you work prior, arrangements can be made by contacting Leslie Macaulay, show co-ordinator.

At this time, the Pompeii Show is still a go. The Science Center is determining a new schedule – we will alert the membership when we get confirmation.