Recap of Jan. 9 CFWS general meeting with Caryn Dahm

Sunday, January 9th was a beautiful day in Central Florida, and a great day for an online demo from Caryn Dahm!

Caryn loves to paint FOOD! She does a lot of commission work as well as teaching and “Live Painting.” See her website at caryndahm.com and find out more about it. She prefers to paint from life but takes photos and also refers to stock photography for details. Sharing some tips she told us about: using porcelain pallets for splitting warms and cools; using a nail file or a magic eraser to scrub out highlights; using a Stadler Mars Plastic eraser for better control. She often uses Prismacolor pencils and Derwent pencils for metallics.

Her sketch of a fruit tart was very light and she had used masking fluid to mask out highlights. Her technique was loose and interpretive of her subject, leaving the white of the paper to full advantage. Caryn uses the natural drying time to take breaks and frequently has several projects going at the same time. She says “You can do that with watercolor.” She dabs in strong color and then comes back with water to move it around in the shape. “It’s much livelier if you let the water make it dance. Drop in other colors to make it more interesting.” She captures what she likes about her subject rather than going for photo-realism. Vary the color, value and texture within an object. Burnt Umber, Pthalo Blue and Paynes Grey are her go to for darks. Caryn uses a flashlight to show where the shadows lie and keep them interesting. “Keep that light source in mind for shape and continuity.” Turn the painting upside down to check the shapes, vary soft and crisp edges.

Caryn shared with us how she scans art into Photoshop, highlighting resolution, file name and file type. We discussed using .tiffs or .pdf files for print and .jpg or .png for online submissions and posting on your website. Scanning should be done at 300 dpi for print and 72 dpi for online use. This information is useful for preparing art for entry into shows and for use in printing. Some people use Picasso and other free applications to do their scanning because Photoshop is very expensive unless you are using it for commission work. Caryn showed us some of the types of images she does for clients and how it is a good revenue stream for her in her home studio. She showed us how you can do something you love and make a successful business out of it. Thank you Caryn, it was fun!

Join us next month when our demonstrating artist will be Ron Malone! He is back by popular demand!

General Meeting, Oct. 3, 2021 Recap – Joan Lok, Demonstration artist

Forty-four members were in attendance for the October meeting. Pam started us off with a quick busines meeting and announcements.

Nov. 7 – The demo will be by Tim Wilmot:   https://www.timwilmot.com

Dec. 5Holiday Party at Kingswood Manor, off Lee Rd. There will be the raffle, mini paintings, members paintings, outdoor tent for finger foods, and a special appearance by Santa. Masks required for indoor activities. See our newsletter for details and sign up to help with and activity!

Feb. 6 – We hope to line up Niko Floyd, as a plein air event at Kingswood Manor. Check back for more info.

Our annual members art show will be chaired by Charlie Cipes. The juror and workshop artist will be Sue Archer. The workshop “Commanding Color” will be March 7, 8, 9, 2022 at a location to be determined.

Please check our website frequently and read the newsletter for continual updates on our upcoming season, and please consider volunteering to help us set up events.

Then Pam introduced our demonstration artist, Joan Lok, former president of the Sumi-e Society of America who paints in the Lingnan School style.

Joan talked about the basic 4 Treasures of Sumi-e: Paper, Brush, Ink Stick, and Ink Stone

Paper – we buy watercolor paper in weights of 140 or 300 lb. But rice paper, which is not made of rice but plant bark, is bought by the name of the paper. It comes raw (unsized) so when you touch the brush to the paper is absorbs quickly, or sized with alum, to slow down absorbency. Each family that makes the paper has their own secret recipe.

A variety of hard and soft round brushes
Hard and soft Hake, flat brushes.

Brushes – round brushes are used most of the time and they come in small, medium, large or extra-large sizes. They are constructed to use the entire hair and bristles are gathered to a point. (Our western watercolor brushes are cut to form the point.) Fan or flat brushes are used mostly for washes. Hard hair is bouncy and soft hair brushes, made from goat, is softer and doesn’t have as much bounce. Combo brushes have the harder hair in the middle surrounded by soft absorbent hair.

Ink Stick and stone – the ink is usually made with soot and glue, and then ground on the inkstone with a little water.

Eastern Art has 4 categories:

Mountain and stream landscape by Joan.

Landscapes – also called mountain & water, usually consists of scenery of mountains with water. Joan’s landscapes were painted with a limited palette using indigo for cool tones and burnt sienna for warm tones. Sunlight is not specific to a time of day. Seasons are more obvious.

Figures – which are ceremonial and usually not the center of attention, as is the custom in western art. Humans are shown in harmony with the universe.

Animals – often symbolic, such as fish being good luck. Cicadas, symbolize a hermit who doesn’t care for material things.

Grape vines with bird, by Joan.

Flowers & Birds – Mostly living flowers, in the garden, with birds in the composition.

She then showed a few samples, from the American Watercolor Society’s exhibition, highlighting the use of calligraphic strokes included in AWS paintings.

Diagram of how to triple load a brush.

She showed how to triple load a brush with light tone or water, medium tone yellow, then orange and dark red ink on the tip of the brush.

Flower petals and flower shown from the side.
Triple loaded brush does lovely petals.
Petal strokes for sunflower or cherry blossoms.

Push down, drag and then lift to make the petal. Three cherry blossoms painted holding the brush vertically, loading the brush with light, medium and dark paint. Practice as much as you can so you build “muscle training”.

Do a whole page of strokes, like the “bamboo stroke” which can be used for other things like electrical poles.

Power poles can be painted with the bamboo strokes.
Practice, practice strokes to build muscle memory.

Try the stokes right to left, then left to right. Do a cart wheel, and other strokes to fill a page. Taking Chinese brush painting classes, or sumi-e, can help you brush stokes become looser.

Do a whole page of practice strokes to build muscle memory.

The demonstration painting was a Peony flower.  Double load the brush with water and dark paint and work into the brush.

Double load with water and paint for petals.

Pres and lift the brush to do a thick and thin petal, remember to paint toward the center of the flower.

starting the peony by painting the top petals.
Add 2 side stroke petals.

Then add water and paint 2 side strokes. Build petals outward.

Paint top center petals and build the blossom from the center outward.

After you do the blossom, refine and add a few more layers of petals.

Finished peony blossom.

Then add the leaves. Black or green can be used for sumi leaves. Paint 3 or 4 lobes for the leaves. When the leaf is semi dry add the veins in black. Practice the calligraphic strokes of the veins to elevate your painting.

Leaves have 3 or 4 lobes.
Blossom with green leaves and black veins.

We use green in a big brush. Load with yellow, green and black on the tip. The finished Peony is beautiful. Thank you, Joan!

For online classes with Joan Lok, check her site:   https://joanlokart.thinkific.com

 

 

 

 

Meeting Recap: January 5, 2020

We started the first meeting of 2020 with a dynamic presentation by our super talented member, Dana Daydodge. There was a large group of members ready to learn Dana’s secrets of Underpainting: Reworking old Paintings into new creations!

Dana is a classically trained artist, who has now made her mark in the Central Florida area. While her profession was as an operating room nurse, Dana also had the opportunity to attend the prestigious American Academy of Art in Chicago. Looking for “anywhere warmer than Chicago” to retire, lucky for us, she chose to retire in our backyard!

Dana said she tries to draw or paint every day. Her obvious talent in taking an old painting she didn’t like, and turning it into an award-winning painting works!

She suggested taking an old painting and finding shapes you like. Birds can be easily created from many shapes. Dana shared many examples of her reworked pieces, such as a portrait of a people, which became a colorful, whimsical painting of giraffes….a rhino was originally a painting of a cactus!

While still utilizing her watercolor paints, she added a big squiggle of white gouache onto her palette. But, she likes bold color (especially for backgrounds, bold color can cover up unwanted shapes)!

In addition to the tubes of Holbein watercolor and gouache, she had water soluble pencils (Faber Castell), crayons (Caran D’ache), ArtGraf graphite blocks, and Staedler watercolor Brush Pens to create these magical creations.

Dana also reiterated the importance of best quality paper. She uses 140lb. Cotton rag because she does numerous lifting and overpainting multiple times.

Dana, not only a talented artist but also one of our strongest supporters, not only generously gave of her time for our demo, but also donated one of her paintings to be raffled off! Needless to say, we quickly sold more raffle tickets.! Thank you, Dana, for donating your time, talent and passion to our membership.   –   Pam

Use gouache to overpaint areas with different colors.
Start with birds because they are easy to do.
A pink Faber-Castell pencil is used to form a beak.

    You can overpaint only over a watercolor or acrylic painting. Oil will bleed through or crack. Supplies she had: Gouache, Holbein watercolors, Staedtler watercolour brush pens, ArtGraf water soluble tailor chalk, Caran d’Ache Neocolor II artist crayons, and more.

All of these supplies can be found at our generous sponsors…. ArtSystems, Cheap Joe’s and Blick art materials.
Please remember to support all of our sponsors.
Thank you! ?

Meeting Recap September 8, 2019

In case you missed it: 

Our new season was kicked off with a fun members meeting called “What I Did This Summer”. Pam Merle, one of our new co-presidents, introduced our 2019-2020 calendar. It is going to be an awesome year! Check your newsletter and the CFWS website for more details.

September 16 -21, the Florida Watercolor Society is holding their annual convention, tradeshow and art exhibit in Orlando. Please contact Susan Donohoe for some really great volunteer positions. We need our members help to make this the best convention so far!

https://floridawatercolorsociety.org/events/#!event/2019/9/19/fws-convention-volunteer-opportunities

The Altamonte Chapel has asked our society to partner with them once again on the October 19 “Arts and Crafts Day/Plein Air” event. CFWS members can reserve a spot for their table and handcrafted arts for only $10. You keep all the profits! We also need teacher volunteers to set up free watercolor lessons to our community. Please contact Serina Ramos-Colon to reserve your table and Terri Chin for teaching and Marcela Moglia for plein air.

November 16, Niko Floyd will be doing another one-day workshop “Perspectives in Drawing”. Niko is back by popular demand and will also do our general meeting demonstration on November 3. Reserve your space for his popular workshop now!

Our annual juried members show will be from February 6 – March 29, 2020 at the SOBO gallery in Winter Garden. The last day for entering your artwork in the show is November 15, 2019. This is only 9 weeks away, so get your brushes moving!  Don Andrews will be our juror and will also offer a 3-day workshop “Landscapes, Composition and Color” February 10-12. Early Bird members registration is $300 before October 31 – so reserve now!

A special summer exhibit is planned at the Orlando Science Center. The theme is “Images of Pompeii” and we will be using the photographs of our members who have been to Pompeii as inspiration for our masterpieces. Please contact Cindy Sturla or Marcela Moglia if you are willing to share your travel photos for this blockbuster exhibit!

Marcela announced some upcoming plein air events:

September 21 – Kraft Azalea Gardens in Winter Park

October 19 – Altamonte Chapel campus

November 16 – Mead Botanical Gardens in Winter Park

We took a break to grab some munchies and then settled down to a wonderful series of members paintings and the stories behind the artwork. So many different styles, from journaling, to plein air to framed paintings were presented. Everyone who brought art had a chance to stand up and talk about the experience. It was a ton of fun!

Meeting Recap for April 7, 2019

Ken Austin thanked members for honoring him at the reception.

Introducing Diana Eagles– our new, hospitality chair!

Diane Darnall – membership chair made an announcement on renewing your CFWS membership.

Marcela announced upcoming plein air dates: April 13 – Environmental Garden in Oviedo. June 22 – Orlando Science Center Pop Up/Plein Air event

All CFWS members are invited to our next board meeting on April 18 at 10 am at the Casselberry library on Oxford Rd. Snacks provided.

Interested in becoming our new PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT?

Membership in CFWS has many benefits: free demos, developing your skills in workshops, displaying your artwork in various exhibits, networking with other artists and organizations, accessing our CFWS library of books and DVDs’, outreach to our community and introducing the public to the wonderful world of watercolor. Volunteering has been documented to keep you physically and mentally active by allowing you to use your talents and experience. Managing our operations with volunteers is critical to keeping our fees low.      Contact Teresa Chin or Mary Dall asap to learn more.

CONNIE HAMILTON gave a wonderful demo on the healing power of journaling. She provided handouts and many samples – 37 books – of her work. Impressive! Some popular journalists include Roz Stendahl, Liz Steel, Thomas Thorspecken, and Gabriel Campanario, who began the urban sketch movement. Strathmore watercolor is one of her favorites. Bienfang, 97lbs. is too light. You can draw anywhere: jury duty, hospitals, the beach or what you had for lunch. Strathmore mixed media without rings is a good journal. The Beta series premium sketchbooks have good heavy paper. Her favorite pen is a Micron, but many journalists use fountain pens. Koi paints in small pocket sets work well for travel as well as getting a small empty palette and fill with your favorite paint like Daniel Smith or Winsor Newton. Escoda or Jack Richeson brush kits are good travel brushes as well as piston watercolor brushes. The Art Toolkit has several small sizes for purchase. All of her supplies fit into a handy backpack and away she goes! Her final tips: 1. Put a sketchbook in your purse/pocket.  2. Draw what moves you.  3. Enjoy other people’s work.  4. Draw in a group.  5. Follow your passion. Check out: Connie’s Color on Facebook and conniehamilton563 on Instagram to see her work! Thank you Connie!

   

         

 

 

November 4, 2018 Meeting Recap

         Jane Brinckerhoff presented a slide show on how to resize images for competition in art shows. All watercolor societies are going digital This is very important information for all artists wanting to enter shows. With warmth and humor she walked us through the steps and pointed out that we have a video, on our website, on using the online editor Pixlr. Look under Member’s Resources_CFWS Tutorial: Resizing Images.

Cindy invited a special guest: Rachel Frisby, Curator, Albin Polasek Museum, to discuss our upcoming summer show: “Precious Pollinators: The Central Florida Watercolor Society,” Exhibition: May 7 – August 25, 2019. A BIG “Thank You” to Cindy Sturla for all her hard work with Rachel to set up this show! It is a huge accomplishment that Cindy has been working on for close to a year now!

Kim Minichiello talked about the upcoming Florida Watercolor Convention in Orlando next year. Many volunteer opportunities will be available to fill. Also, remember to sign up for the workshops early!

Our own CFWS member show will be March 4 – 30th at the Casselberry Art House. Deadline for submissions is January 6, but don’t wait until the last minute!

Marcela Moglia passed around the Plein Air/Pop Up booklet for volunteers to sign in. Our last 2 Pop Up events that our United Grant funded are in December 21 in the Mt. Dora Center for the Arts Gallery and January26 at the Orlando Science Center. We still need a few more teachers and artists for these venues… Please contact Marcela or Teresa Chin. Thanks!

Judi Kaye made an announcement about MOPS, an organization for mothers of preschoolers. Donations of small paintings and cards for their party in December would be terrific. Deadline to Judi is Nov. 16. Please contact her for pick up or mailing instructions. The artist/CFWS will get credit and recognition for the donations.

December 2, The CFWS Holiday Party will be a bit smaller this year.    Bring one painting per member, please not larger than 24” on one side.  There will be an award given for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place for those paintings which win the ‘People’s Choice Awards’. Please bring a table easel or small floor easel with your painting.

The Board will provide substantial finger food, snacks, coffee and tea.  We ask that the members help us supplement our contribution with any additional small platters finger food and sweets they would like to bring. Since we are working with a limited serving space we ask that you DO NOT BRING  HOT PLATES, CASSEROLES, COOKING POTS, LARGE PLATTERS OR FOOD WITH SERVING UTENSILS.  SNACK OR FINGER FOOD ONLY, PLEASE.

Our space is limited and we have to downsize this year. Krys Pettit has been working hard on organizing and getting special surprise gifts for us.

Our silent auction is still running and you still have time to make a bid on the Used Sony Handycam HDR – CX 330 which does video and still photography.

NOTE: We will need teachers for the last two Pop Up events, December 21 in the Mt. Dora Center for the Arts Gallery and January 26 at the Orlando Science Center. Email Teresa Chin or Marcela Moglia to volunteer.