General Meeting, Oct. 3, 2021 Recap – Joan Lok, Demonstration artist

Forty-four members were in attendance for the October meeting. Pam started us off with a quick busines meeting and announcements.

Nov. 7 – The demo will be by Tim Wilmot:   https://www.timwilmot.com

Dec. 5Holiday Party at Kingswood Manor, off Lee Rd. There will be the raffle, mini paintings, members paintings, outdoor tent for finger foods, and a special appearance by Santa. Masks required for indoor activities. See our newsletter for details and sign up to help with and activity!

Feb. 6 – We hope to line up Niko Floyd, as a plein air event at Kingswood Manor. Check back for more info.

Our annual members art show will be chaired by Charlie Cipes. The juror and workshop artist will be Sue Archer. The workshop “Commanding Color” will be March 7, 8, 9, 2022 at a location to be determined.

Please check our website frequently and read the newsletter for continual updates on our upcoming season, and please consider volunteering to help us set up events.

Then Pam introduced our demonstration artist, Joan Lok, former president of the Sumi-e Society of America who paints in the Lingnan School style.

Joan talked about the basic 4 Treasures of Sumi-e: Paper, Brush, Ink Stick, and Ink Stone

Paper – we buy watercolor paper in weights of 140 or 300 lb. But rice paper, which is not made of rice but plant bark, is bought by the name of the paper. It comes raw (unsized) so when you touch the brush to the paper is absorbs quickly, or sized with alum, to slow down absorbency. Each family that makes the paper has their own secret recipe.

A variety of hard and soft round brushes
Hard and soft Hake, flat brushes.

Brushes – round brushes are used most of the time and they come in small, medium, large or extra-large sizes. They are constructed to use the entire hair and bristles are gathered to a point. (Our western watercolor brushes are cut to form the point.) Fan or flat brushes are used mostly for washes. Hard hair is bouncy and soft hair brushes, made from goat, is softer and doesn’t have as much bounce. Combo brushes have the harder hair in the middle surrounded by soft absorbent hair.

Ink Stick and stone – the ink is usually made with soot and glue, and then ground on the inkstone with a little water.

Eastern Art has 4 categories:

Mountain and stream landscape by Joan.

Landscapes – also called mountain & water, usually consists of scenery of mountains with water. Joan’s landscapes were painted with a limited palette using indigo for cool tones and burnt sienna for warm tones. Sunlight is not specific to a time of day. Seasons are more obvious.

Figures – which are ceremonial and usually not the center of attention, as is the custom in western art. Humans are shown in harmony with the universe.

Animals – often symbolic, such as fish being good luck. Cicadas, symbolize a hermit who doesn’t care for material things.

Grape vines with bird, by Joan.

Flowers & Birds – Mostly living flowers, in the garden, with birds in the composition.

She then showed a few samples, from the American Watercolor Society’s exhibition, highlighting the use of calligraphic strokes included in AWS paintings.

Diagram of how to triple load a brush.

She showed how to triple load a brush with light tone or water, medium tone yellow, then orange and dark red ink on the tip of the brush.

Flower petals and flower shown from the side.
Triple loaded brush does lovely petals.
Petal strokes for sunflower or cherry blossoms.

Push down, drag and then lift to make the petal. Three cherry blossoms painted holding the brush vertically, loading the brush with light, medium and dark paint. Practice as much as you can so you build “muscle training”.

Do a whole page of strokes, like the “bamboo stroke” which can be used for other things like electrical poles.

Power poles can be painted with the bamboo strokes.
Practice, practice strokes to build muscle memory.

Try the stokes right to left, then left to right. Do a cart wheel, and other strokes to fill a page. Taking Chinese brush painting classes, or sumi-e, can help you brush stokes become looser.

Do a whole page of practice strokes to build muscle memory.

The demonstration painting was a Peony flower.  Double load the brush with water and dark paint and work into the brush.

Double load with water and paint for petals.

Pres and lift the brush to do a thick and thin petal, remember to paint toward the center of the flower.

starting the peony by painting the top petals.
Add 2 side stroke petals.

Then add water and paint 2 side strokes. Build petals outward.

Paint top center petals and build the blossom from the center outward.

After you do the blossom, refine and add a few more layers of petals.

Finished peony blossom.

Then add the leaves. Black or green can be used for sumi leaves. Paint 3 or 4 lobes for the leaves. When the leaf is semi dry add the veins in black. Practice the calligraphic strokes of the veins to elevate your painting.

Leaves have 3 or 4 lobes.
Blossom with green leaves and black veins.

We use green in a big brush. Load with yellow, green and black on the tip. The finished Peony is beautiful. Thank you, Joan!

For online classes with Joan Lok, check her site:   https://joanlokart.thinkific.com