POMPEII:
The Immortal City

TheOrlando Science Center has collaborated with members of the Central Florida Watercolor Society to create work with a Pompeii theme.

TBD DUE TO COVID-19 PANDEMIC
AT THE
ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER

View the work of each artist by selecting name from the list below:

Rosalie Tarr has tried to instill in her family an appreciation for our beautiful " Land of Flowers".  New to watercolor, each workshop comes new knowledge of color palettes and learning the interaction of the beautiful pigments on various papers.  In addition to very special friendships kindled, a wonderful surprise is the completely new way her eyes view the world and the challenge to transpose those visions to paper with her growing knowledge of these beautiful transparent colors.

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“The Harvest” 
Watercolor, 2020

Viticulture thrived in Pompeii, both as private and commercial applications. The fertile volcanic soil and temperate climate conditions were ideal for growing of grapes. Commercial vineyards produced thousands of liters of wine for sale and export. Vineyards have been excavated with over a hundred dolia (large earthenware vessels) buried for storing wine. Some vineyards had the capacity to store up to 50,000 liters. Individual homeowners and small innkeepers would have their own garden vineyards to produce wine for themselves as well as their guests. The types of grapes grown in the area, Murgentine specific to Pompeii and Horconian vines found in the surrounding area of Campania, have been identified by preserved remains of the vines.