General Meeting, Oct. 3, 2021 Recap – Joan Lok, Demonstration artist

Forty-four members were in attendance for the October meeting. Pam started us off with a quick busines meeting and announcements.

Nov. 7 – The demo will be by Tim Wilmot:   https://www.timwilmot.com

Dec. 5Holiday Party at Kingswood Manor, off Lee Rd. There will be the raffle, mini paintings, members paintings, outdoor tent for finger foods, and a special appearance by Santa. Masks required for indoor activities. See our newsletter for details and sign up to help with and activity!

Feb. 6 – We hope to line up Niko Floyd, as a plein air event at Kingswood Manor. Check back for more info.

Our annual members art show will be chaired by Charlie Cipes. The juror and workshop artist will be Sue Archer. The workshop “Commanding Color” will be March 7, 8, 9, 2022 at a location to be determined.

Please check our website frequently and read the newsletter for continual updates on our upcoming season, and please consider volunteering to help us set up events.

Then Pam introduced our demonstration artist, Joan Lok, former president of the Sumi-e Society of America who paints in the Lingnan School style.

Joan talked about the basic 4 Treasures of Sumi-e: Paper, Brush, Ink Stick, and Ink Stone

Paper – we buy watercolor paper in weights of 140 or 300 lb. But rice paper, which is not made of rice but plant bark, is bought by the name of the paper. It comes raw (unsized) so when you touch the brush to the paper is absorbs quickly, or sized with alum, to slow down absorbency. Each family that makes the paper has their own secret recipe.

A variety of hard and soft round brushes
Hard and soft Hake, flat brushes.

Brushes – round brushes are used most of the time and they come in small, medium, large or extra-large sizes. They are constructed to use the entire hair and bristles are gathered to a point. (Our western watercolor brushes are cut to form the point.) Fan or flat brushes are used mostly for washes. Hard hair is bouncy and soft hair brushes, made from goat, is softer and doesn’t have as much bounce. Combo brushes have the harder hair in the middle surrounded by soft absorbent hair.

Ink Stick and stone – the ink is usually made with soot and glue, and then ground on the inkstone with a little water.

Eastern Art has 4 categories:

Mountain and stream landscape by Joan.

Landscapes – also called mountain & water, usually consists of scenery of mountains with water. Joan’s landscapes were painted with a limited palette using indigo for cool tones and burnt sienna for warm tones. Sunlight is not specific to a time of day. Seasons are more obvious.

Figures – which are ceremonial and usually not the center of attention, as is the custom in western art. Humans are shown in harmony with the universe.

Animals – often symbolic, such as fish being good luck. Cicadas, symbolize a hermit who doesn’t care for material things.

Grape vines with bird, by Joan.

Flowers & Birds – Mostly living flowers, in the garden, with birds in the composition.

She then showed a few samples, from the American Watercolor Society’s exhibition, highlighting the use of calligraphic strokes included in AWS paintings.

Diagram of how to triple load a brush.

She showed how to triple load a brush with light tone or water, medium tone yellow, then orange and dark red ink on the tip of the brush.

Flower petals and flower shown from the side.
Triple loaded brush does lovely petals.
Petal strokes for sunflower or cherry blossoms.

Push down, drag and then lift to make the petal. Three cherry blossoms painted holding the brush vertically, loading the brush with light, medium and dark paint. Practice as much as you can so you build “muscle training”.

Do a whole page of strokes, like the “bamboo stroke” which can be used for other things like electrical poles.

Power poles can be painted with the bamboo strokes.
Practice, practice strokes to build muscle memory.

Try the stokes right to left, then left to right. Do a cart wheel, and other strokes to fill a page. Taking Chinese brush painting classes, or sumi-e, can help you brush stokes become looser.

Do a whole page of practice strokes to build muscle memory.

The demonstration painting was a Peony flower.  Double load the brush with water and dark paint and work into the brush.

Double load with water and paint for petals.

Pres and lift the brush to do a thick and thin petal, remember to paint toward the center of the flower.

starting the peony by painting the top petals.
Add 2 side stroke petals.

Then add water and paint 2 side strokes. Build petals outward.

Paint top center petals and build the blossom from the center outward.

After you do the blossom, refine and add a few more layers of petals.

Finished peony blossom.

Then add the leaves. Black or green can be used for sumi leaves. Paint 3 or 4 lobes for the leaves. When the leaf is semi dry add the veins in black. Practice the calligraphic strokes of the veins to elevate your painting.

Leaves have 3 or 4 lobes.
Blossom with green leaves and black veins.

We use green in a big brush. Load with yellow, green and black on the tip. The finished Peony is beautiful. Thank you, Joan!

For online classes with Joan Lok, check her site:   https://joanlokart.thinkific.com

 

 

 

 

General Meeting, Sept. 12,2021 “Show and Tell”

   CFWS President Pam Chock, started off our new 2021-2022 season with a lively general meeting via Zoom. There were lots of beautiful paintings and information to share!

David Williams announced the senior painting group will begin Oct. 8th, at Casselberry Art House. Contact 407-262-7700, Ext. 112 for more info. He also asked us to call Marks Street Center at 407-254-1066, to ask them to reopen for the painting group.

New Season!

Our October demo artist will be Joan Lok, who will introduce the art of sumi-e  (Water and Ink Painting).  She will discuss its origin, materials, and the art form’s emphasis on brushwork, by creating floral and natural subjects.

Our November demo artist will be UK watercolor artist, Tim Wilmot, teaching his loose style of watercolor from composition to finished work.

Volunteers needed!  We need someone to help with our CFWS checking account. If you have one, you are qualified to help! Simple math is all that’s needed.

We also need help with our annual show. Good communication skills are all that’s needed. We have the juror, Sue Archer, signed up and need help with dates. She will conduct our workshop, at McRae studios on March 7, 8, 9, 2022.

If you have an artist you would like to watch while they do a demo for our group, please let a board member know ASAP. We still have a few spots to fill in 2022.

Membership chair, Diane Darnall, said we have 99 members.

      Congratulations to these CFWS members who were accepted into the Florida Watercolor 50th Anniversary show!    Diana Eagles – In Her Own World, Ron Malone – Rackleman Garden Guitar, Jackii Molsick – Captain Jack, Marian Wagster – First Date, S. Africa Series, Kim Minichiello – Bushido (In Memoriam)

Our Sanford art show at City Hall is getting great reviews. If you haven’t seen our Youtube video – check it out soon! Thank you to Cindy Sturla for setting this up!

     SHOW AND TELL BY THE CFWS MEMBERS!

Shelly H. started our show and tell with a landscape painting from Maui, Hawaii
Marianna Ross – b&w study and completed trees with human forms
Pam C. – lobster, sea creatures, inspired by French drawings
Cindy S. – geese in a German plein air
Nancy L. – Vase with real flowers … dried in a microwave and added with Elmers glue.
Terri C.– Rainbow Lorikeets, in the Chinese Brush Painting style
Marian W. – Lake Apopka drive, Cattle Egrets. She masked the birds and poured the background.
David W. – American flag in an old, textured wooden house.
Sandi B. – Bee house at Nehrling gardens
Roberta L. – Scotland bagpipe players getting ready for a show
Marcela M. – Chapel on the cliffs of Algarve, Portugal.

  Judy K. – Journaling at WDW, a colorful bird inspired by a Judith Leiber bag and a blue vase.

Ann W. – Kraft Azalea Gardens landscape
Sharon S. – Heron from a San Diego photo
Gini McDonald – Studaies from Jean Haines book, palette colors that are put on paper and allowed to run down. See if they work well together.
Gini – Checking colors to see if they’ll work.
Thouraya Z. – Intuitive. Sumi inks and watercolor on top of a marbeling technique.
Karen C. – boat on ocean and rain in distance, Grand Cayman dive, gouache and palette knife for waves
Mike M. – Seashore, water, in the style of Tim Wilmot, whose YouTube videos are available for study.
Jane B. – A black bird seen from the car at the Apopka Wildlife Drive
Mary D. – her granddaughter and her Mom, at the beach
Mary – Iceland cold and grey
Janet A. – White ground orchid. Paper hands represent tending her garden.
Julie N. – Red rose painted in Patty Kane’s class at Crealde.
Susan G.M. – dog park in New Smyrna Beach, with undulating sand and lighthouse.
Julie S. – a one color lake scene done in green/blue acrylic.
Debbie G. – Leu Gardens Barred Owl. The hard part was getting the pink/grey color
Dawn S. – White Chapel, inspired while studying “Alwyn Crawshaw paints on Holiday”

Mary reminded us to submit a painting for the Rotary Club of Casselberry Community Arts Calendar. Her painting of her granddaughter and her Mom was featured in July.

David and Nancy invited all of us to join them at the Princeton Senior Center, on Tuesdays from 9 to 1 pm.     Address: 2393 Elizabeth Avenue, behind a Grammar school. Park in lot behind school.

See you soon!

 

 

 

 

May 2 General Meeting/Election/Show & Tell

Pam welcomed everyone to the last general members meeting of the 2021 season.  We had our members election, of our four officers of the society, as first order of business.

Pam Chock (Merle) and Charlie (Charlotte) Cipes were unanimously reelected as co-presidents.

Richelle Siska was elected our new vice president.

Mary Dall was reelected as secretary.

Marilyn Rathbun, CPA, still working with Pam as our treasurer.

Congratulations to all! There was a great round of applause!

The last board meeting of our season is May 20. Members are invited to attend the fun! Learn what goes on behind the scenes!

There were some announcements from members: The Polk Museum of Art has a Toulouse-Lautrec exhibit up until May 23.

https://polkmuseumofart.org

Lakeland Art Guild Third Online Exhibition, CFWS member Ron Malone is in:  https://lakelandartguild.clubexpress.com/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=633638&module_id=416405

Lakeland Art Guild – 49th Annual Melvin Gallery Art Exhibition, CFWS members Marcela Moglia, Leslie Rossetti, Mary Kathryn Van Kleunen, Dorothy Cline are in:  https://lakelandartguild.clubexpress.com/content.aspx?page_id=0&club_id=633638

Richelle Siska put together a lovely slide show of art that our members have been working on over the last few months. The CFWS Show & Tell  were 14 wonderful pieces of art. Here they are:

Standing Tall by Mary Dall
Misty by Alice Dressner
Hope on the Horizon by Susan Greenlee-Mamon
Arbor Day Farmers Market by Stewart Jones
Eau De Parfum by Richelle Jarc (Siska)
The Queens by Judith Kaye
Yellow Crested Night Heron by Nancy Larkin
Four Owls by Roberta Lerman
Orchids by Marianna Ross
Floofing by Leslie Rossetti
Rock Landscape by Susie Schreiber
Bad Hair Day by Marion Wagster
Planting Time by Ann Worrall
Water Lily by Thouraya Zapara
Quantum Leap Winery by Teresa Chin

More paintings, and great art tips, were shared from our members at the zoom meeting:

Pat Shaer’s abstract
David Williams’ portrait
Dawn Shumard’s mother and child
Leslie holds up the Loew Cornell fine line pen
Paint fine lines with white for whiskers or do your signature with this pen.

https://www.amazon.com/Loew-Cornell-Fine-Line-Painting-2-Pack/dp/B011C4F9YY/ref=sr_1_2?crid=25AGLLUSHS3H&dchild=1&keywords=low+cornell+paint+pen&qid=1620422680&sprefix=low+cornell%2Caps%2C199&sr=8-2

Jane Brinckerhoff’s painting of Nehrling Gardens

Cheri Ptacek’s Girl on Beach
Mary Kathryn Van Kleunen’s White Bird
Faye Tambrino’s Landscape
Pam (Chock) Merle’s Seascape

      Pam had a great tip on using yellow frog tape to tape down your paintings. It is a low tack tape for delicate surfaces found here:

https://www.amazon.com/FrogTape-Delicate-Surface-Painting-280221/dp/B004Y6TJAS/ref=asc_df_B004Y6TJAS/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=193154321880&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=18132549816371865405&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9011518&hvtargid=pla-307142242740&psc=1

See how much action and information you can miss if you don’t come to the meetings!?  Our members are a wealth of inspiration and knowledge!

Keep painting!  Remember to enter the Summer of Art Online Show … and see you soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Membership Meeting 11/1 with Frank Eber

Frank Eber Demo
Membership Meeting
Sunday, November 1, 2020

Another ZOOM members meeting took place with Frank Eber, AWS, AIS, NWS, from his home studio in northern California. We had over 50 members signed in to ZOOM for our monthly meeting! …Everyone showed up although there was no promise of our famous hospitality spread at Altamonte Chapel….We hope we’ll be back one day to break bread and share together, and in person.

In the meantime, we were mesmerized by Frank Eber’s gentle style, wry humor and bits and pieces of advice sprinkled throughout his demo. A consummate painter, student of famed Italian poster illustrator, Renato Casaro, and distinguished teacher, Frank first took us through his set up, equipment and paint selections.

Because of the dry conditions in California, he keeps a humidifier above his painting surface to keep his wet in wet compositions from drying too soon. It was a lovely effect to see him painting while a slight fog was wisping over his paper….he compared it to, “English Watercolor Artists painting in the foggy atmosphere of the British Isles.”

Frank Eber uses his own daVinci Brushes

He also showed us his brushes, which zoom allowed for screen shots to keep for our records. The big hack was his $5 Chinese brushes from Amazon, which we promptly ordered. He also has his own brand of da Vinci Squirrel mop brushes, and completes his tool set with old rounds, which he uses to scruff up his atmospheric compositions.

Hake brush

Frank uses a block to manipulate the angle of his Arches CP paper. His ZOOM camera enabled us to see him stand and paint, while we could see his palette and paper on his new overhead phone camera. (Was that the new iphone Frank?)

Starts with primaries and colors for a sky wash.

As he began his demo Frank shared stories about his European childhood, and his classic training in oil painting. He was lucky in that his teacher, Renato Casaro, worked with gouache and so he had an early introduction to water base media in addition to oil. Frank uses Holbein and Daniel Smith paints, and has a pretty simple palette of primary colors in addition to neutral tint, horizon blue (Holbein) and some of the cobalt turquoise colors. He prefers to mix his own green.

Daniel Smith – German Greenish Raw Umber

The actual painting began, wet into wet, as Frank threw his body, mind and soul into his art. This observer really saw a complete, fully engaged artist using all of his senses to create his work. His posture, breathing, relaxed mood added so much to his technical abilities. This artist also has a great sense of humor, which was brave as everyone was muted and so he could not hear us chuckle!!!

The composition began wet into wet, a landscape with sky, river and trees. It is a scene very familiar to the artist, but he still sketched it out in pencil and had a photo reference to check back to.

After completing the wet into wet first layer, we waited for it to dry (so fast in California!) so he could go in again, wet into wet, and work the areas he wanted to intensify. He also mentioned that for every cool blue (or green or red, etc) you have to alternate a warm blue within the same subject. This keeps it natural and the eye welcomes this warmth vs cool content.

Close up of the texture created by flicking water and pigments.

Frank then went in with his Chinese brushes to add texture, trees, and additional accent and color to his composition. Of course, pictures tell a thousand words. See for yourself, how beautiful this painting turned out, all in front of our eyes.

The final beautiful painting!

After another great CFWS member meeting, we were saying our goodbyes to Frank in hopes that we can have him for a workshop, in person, in the next few years!

We’re happy to see so many members joining us for these valuable demonstrations by renowned artists. Please join us for the next demo on December 6.

Members watch Frank paint the sky and river.

Recap of General Meeting, Oct. 4, 2020 with Joel Popodics demo

Joel Popodics did a demonstration of Liberty Hill Farm with cows. He’s noted for his greens. There were 3 cameras set up:  1. Him     2. The painting     3. His palette   He started with a drawing of the scene.

pencil drawing

He wet the entire paper, which was a full sheet of 300# watercolor paper. Thick paper doesn’t buckle as he uses so much water. The sizing is broken down a little and oils from his hand can be cleaned up as he brushes on the water.

cobalt blue and cadmium scarlet pour for sky

Cobalt blue is a true blue and good for skies with ultramarine a good choice for the apex. Winsor blue has a bit of green which is good for a cold sky. Cadmium scarlet was poured in the middle. Payne’s grey with a bit of ivory black and cobalt blue was used for the clouds.

clouds in grey and blocking in trees

There are 3 stages of wetness: 1. Saturated     2. Moist, with shine disappearing    3. Damp

He blocked in the trees and shared a tip that adding a bit of red to the green will push back the faraway trees. Using a square brush and scrapping on the side helps make natural edges. A script brush is good for small trunks and branches. Try to get at least 6 values in trees for realism. The final painting was a lovely and restful scene of a barn, trees, cows and rolling hills.

red barn with cows up front
final with spots on cows and shadows added

It was a fun and educational demo….     Thank you Joel!   https://www.watercolorpop.com

President recap: “What I Did This Summer” 9/13/20

At first, there were just two of us in the waiting room….then, two more, and then 5, 10, 15, twenty…more and more CFWS members attending the kickoff season meeting, “What I Did This Summer”.

Were all these members meeting at the Altamonte Chapel? (We need more chairs!)  Were we waiting in our cars in the steamy afternoon heat? Were we trying to bum an extra easel to prop up our work in the chapel?

After admitting 60 of our member friends into the meeting, the inaugural CFWS 2020-2021 season kicked off on ZOOM. Always a popular time to see old friends we’ve missed over the summer, we did not want to have to cancel this popular meeting due to the COVID 19 Pandemic.

What do artists do when they’re bored? Quarantined? Under lockdown with Mother Nature outside? We MAKE ART!!! And, we like to show everybody what we did….so, undaunted, everyone courageously downloaded the ZOOM App and we had 60 members online, joining in on the meeting. Let me tell you, seeing 50 smiling faces staring back at you will make anybody happy for a long time.

We had over twenty artists show their beautiful works of art, along with raised hands, comments and emoji’s of oohs and aahs. Almost like a real meeting at Altamonte Chapel! (Not. Remember the snack time)

But, it was still fun to hear everybody’s voices and see their smiling faces. My favorite part was the Nancy and Sharon Show, where they run between houses, ipads, and swimming pools showing us their beautiful creations, and all in bare feet!

Ken Austin kicked off the festivities with some beautiful matted (nice touch, Ken) floral block print/paintings. Dot Cline, who lives in assisted living and was not allowed to leave her facility, painted a gorgeous red flower right outside her door.

Marian Wagster shared her grand, full sheet paintings, and they all fit within the ZOOM screen…We also liked David Williams Southern Amish painting and his new facial hair. Charlie Cipes wrapped up the meeting with her portrait of her father as a navy pilot. I certainly got chills….via ZOOM!

Every single artist had beautiful works to share, and the other 40 members in the audience all enjoyed it immensely. So, THANK YOU to all our ZOOM SHARERS! You were very brave and generous. The paintings looked beautiful on our screens. We can imagine how beautiful they are when we get to see them in person. Maybe for the MAY 2021 meeting???

Don’t forget to join the fun. Volunteer to be on the BOARD.

Pam and Charlie

       

Richelle recommended a website by Jane Blundell, who makes color swatches of her paints.

 

Meeting Recap – February 9, 2020

Don Andrews demo Meeting recap – At our last member meeting on February 9, Don Andrews, AWS, flew in to teach our annual workshop, jury our show, and present a demo for our members meeting. There were 61 members in attendance!

       Don is a nationally known artist, author and workshop instructor. He is known for his glowing landscapes and figures. His website is donandrewsstudio.com; please go check it out. His granular washes, vibrant colors mixed on paper, and positioning of lights and darks truly makes his paintings stand out.  Right off the bat, he started the demo with a different set up: Don is a lefty; he paints standing up, and he paints at a roughly 35 degree (my rough estimate) slant. It was a truly pleasurable demo from my perfect viewpoint directly behind him, on the floor…some of us in the front row had to watch out for splashes of juicy paint now and then.

     Our demo artist is a consummate pro; he came prepared with a pre-drawn landscape. He uses a Robert E. Wood palette, because he studied under Bob as his protege…he learned to mix colors, using mostly primaries; one set of warm (lemon yellow, cerulean blue, and scarlet lake) and one set of cool (ultramarine blue, burnt Sienna [warm yellow in this case] and Permanent Magenta [a true red]). With the addition of his namesake Cheap Joes American Journey Turquoise, and opera, his paintings glow with color and life.

 

   Starting with his background wet into wet, using a 2” flat, he created his light value wash. Paint was mixed with water at around a 50-50. He taught us that most students usually have too much water in their brush, and reminded us that the paint will always dry lighter. Don’s brushes of choice are American Journey synthetic sable rounds, 10 and 12, and he paints a lot of his details with his 1” flat Robert Simmons white synthetic sable. This particular Simmons brush is only about 3/4” tall vs. most 1” flats, which are also 1” tall…too tall to hold a strong pigment for granulations.

After he let this initial wash dry, before our very eyes, he began adding more and more dabs of color in stronger values, until this beautiful painting emerged.

      He explained how figures can add vibrance and movement to a composition. Providing us with specific directions on how to draw accurate figures will hopefully, lead to many of us including new figures in our paintings! Heads are rounded off rectangles, not “balls” on a stick. Human proportions are all similar: 10% head, 50% torso, and 40% legs will create a believable person.

     Another cool thing Don does is keep a waterproof mat on hand so he can constantly check his composition – when a painting is properly matted, that wide band of white really helps to see where one needs to add or blend, soften or texturize, highlight or glaze, etc. Placing the mat on the just completed painting elicited genuine oohs and aahs…all in all, a very satisfying demo!

     Thank you again to Don Andrews for so generously and patiently sharing his wisdom with us. Please go to: donandrewsstudio.com for his brand-new video series, Designing Nature, where he gives instant, (hilarious) and lifetime access to all of his teachings and demos in 35 tutorials. All for $99!!! I’m getting one as soon as it launches. Stay        tuned for an announcement any day now.

Meeting Recap: January 5, 2020

We started the first meeting of 2020 with a dynamic presentation by our super talented member, Dana Daydodge. There was a large group of members ready to learn Dana’s secrets of Underpainting: Reworking old Paintings into new creations!

Dana is a classically trained artist, who has now made her mark in the Central Florida area. While her profession was as an operating room nurse, Dana also had the opportunity to attend the prestigious American Academy of Art in Chicago. Looking for “anywhere warmer than Chicago” to retire, lucky for us, she chose to retire in our backyard!

Dana said she tries to draw or paint every day. Her obvious talent in taking an old painting she didn’t like, and turning it into an award-winning painting works!

She suggested taking an old painting and finding shapes you like. Birds can be easily created from many shapes. Dana shared many examples of her reworked pieces, such as a portrait of a people, which became a colorful, whimsical painting of giraffes….a rhino was originally a painting of a cactus!

While still utilizing her watercolor paints, she added a big squiggle of white gouache onto her palette. But, she likes bold color (especially for backgrounds, bold color can cover up unwanted shapes)!

In addition to the tubes of Holbein watercolor and gouache, she had water soluble pencils (Faber Castell), crayons (Caran D’ache), ArtGraf graphite blocks, and Staedler watercolor Brush Pens to create these magical creations.

Dana also reiterated the importance of best quality paper. She uses 140lb. Cotton rag because she does numerous lifting and overpainting multiple times.

Dana, not only a talented artist but also one of our strongest supporters, not only generously gave of her time for our demo, but also donated one of her paintings to be raffled off! Needless to say, we quickly sold more raffle tickets.! Thank you, Dana, for donating your time, talent and passion to our membership.   –   Pam

Use gouache to overpaint areas with different colors.
Start with birds because they are easy to do.
A pink Faber-Castell pencil is used to form a beak.

    You can overpaint only over a watercolor or acrylic painting. Oil will bleed through or crack. Supplies she had: Gouache, Holbein watercolors, Staedtler watercolour brush pens, ArtGraf water soluble tailor chalk, Caran d’Ache Neocolor II artist crayons, and more.

All of these supplies can be found at our generous sponsors…. ArtSystems, Cheap Joe’s and Blick art materials.
Please remember to support all of our sponsors.
Thank you! ?

Dec. 1 Annual Holiday Meeting and In-House Art Show

Charlotte Cipes, our co-president, opened the meeting!
Back by popular demand, David calls out the ticket numbers and generally has fun!
We were treated to a special appearance by none other than Santa! Ho! Ho! Ho!
Our wonderful VP, Sandi, did an outstanding job organizing the party and collecting so many wonderful donations! Thank you Sandi for all your hard work!

What a great time was had at our annual members holiday meeting and in-house art show. Sandi got our members lots of great drawing prizes and there was so much food from our member chefs! Thank you to all our sponsors and volunteers!

Lots of great food!
Thank you Tom Jones for your fabulous donations for the drawing!! One lucky member won an original painting by Tom!!

Thouraya is thrilled to win a Strathmore Travel pad and Tom Jones winter greeting card!
Mini paintings were exchanged by many talented members.

  

Percy is a long time supporter of the society and we were thrilled that he made it to our party! ArtSystems gave everyone a goodie bag with artistic treats! Thank you for the wonderful gifts Percy!

Marcela holds up Aqua Elite and Neptune #10 watercolor donated by Princeton Artist Brush Co. to all of our members! Wow!
Judi holds her Strathmore watercolor pad and 8 tube paint set!
Lucky Jackii draws a ticket for the Strathmore Artist pad and 8 paint tubes! Thank you to the Strathmore Paper Co.!
Candace gets a Strathmore gift set!

Santa gives George 4 passes to the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art!
Congratulations to Starr on winning the 5 passes to our own Orlando Museum of Art! Thank you OMA!
Wowee Zowee! Pat gets a large Aquaboard, from Ampersand, for her next masterpiece!! Thanks to Ampersand!

One of our co-presidents and 3 others won Hahnemühle Harmony watercolor pads! Wow!
Ann won a wonderful 12 set of QOR paints! Thank you QOR watercolor company!
Santa hands Terri a Dick Blick Gift Certificate!
Cathy wins a gift certificate from Dick Blick! Happy shopping!
Susan hits the jackpot with 6 bottles of Daler Rowney Aquafina watercolor ink! Congratulations!

Meeting Recap – Oct. 6, 2019

In case you missed it

 
Our first demo of the season was kicked off with Ronald Malone’s “Maximizing Color in Watercolor”Ron demonstrated the best way to photograph your portrait subjects (from the side for more interesting shadow shapes on the face), and the importance of creating a personal color palette for understanding how to mix dramatic color families (cools and warms).  Ron used the example of painting his black and white dog in warms (yellow for hot and cooling in oranges to reds) and the coolest areas in shadow (deep blue/purple to light blues and turquoise).  The lucky attendees received a mini handout book of his demo.  He left us a demo CD for our library for anyone who would like to see his demo examples and lessons! He also donated a beautiful portrait print as a fund raiser/ raffle for our society in the future.  It was a great demo!  Ron Malone is also the Co-Owner of the MARC (Gallery Studio) and gives 1 and 2 day workshops there in Lakeland, Florida (www.the-marc.com).

 

Sandi Hanlon-Breuer, our new vice-president, made the welcome remarks and introduced Ron Malone. Five new guests were in attendance.  Leslie Macauley and Donna Coulantes were thanked for their years of service through planning our CFWS shows.

Marcela Moglia announced some upcoming plein air events (October 19 – Altamonte Chapel campus and November 16 – Mead Botanical Gardens in Winter Park) and the upcoming “Images of Pompeii”, our exciting special summer exhibit at the Orlando Science Center!  We will be using the photographs of our members who have been to Pompeii as inspiration for our masterpieces.  No photos from books or other online sources may be used (unless special permission is given by the photographer and given credit at the exhibition.).  In addition, Marcela reminded us that our annual juried members show will be from February 6 – March 29, 2020 at the SOBO gallery in Winter Garden. The last day for entering your artwork in the show is November 15, 2019!  Don Andrews will be our juror.

Terri Chin announced that the Altamonte Chapel has asked our society to partner with them once again on the October 19 “Arts and Crafts Day/Plein Air” event. CFWS members can reserve a spot for their table and handcrafted arts for only $10. You keep all the profits! We also still need teacher volunteers to set up free watercolor lessons to our community. Please contact Serina Ramos-Colon to reserve your table and Terri Chin for teaching and Marcela Moglia for plein air.

Susan Grogan, reminded us that on November 16, Niko Floyd will be doing another one-day workshop titled “Perspectives in Drawing”. Niko is back by popular demand and will also do our general meeting demonstration on November 3. Reserve your space for his popular workshop now!

Don Andrews will be our juror and will also offer a 3-day workshop titled “Landscapes, Composition and Color” on February 10-12. Early Bird members registration is $300 before October 31 – so reserve now!

Diana Eagles reminded our group that members with the last name D-H, will bring the goodies for our group next month.

It was an amazing demo and lots of fun!  Hope to see everyone there on November 3rd.